Author Topic: Fudz  (Read 1265 times)

mo

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2018, 06:12:59 PM »
Bread flour might work better than all purpose flour. Iíve been making my own thin crust pizzas for a few months now, and itís pretty simple. Itís very similar to a saltine cracker in texture. All purpose flour will work, but itís much more bland and the texture is not as good. Bread flour is also used to make pretzels, which could be an interesting base for bars, but pretzels are not easy to make.

Hereís a no-yeast formula, which is super-easy, but bland and an unexciting texture:
https://www.insidetherustickitchen.com/instant-pizza-dough-no-rise-no-yeast/

This is the recipe that I use for pizzas:
https://www.insidetherustickitchen.com/best-basic-pizza-dough-recipe/
I half this recipe and roll it out super thin.

I tried adding peanut butter to my oatmeal and found that using unsalted peanuts had much more flavor punch, was much more healthy and was much cheaper. I assume youíre using peanut butter as something to hold everything together, but I donít think youíll have much luck with that. Itís going to be oily or crumbly no matter what you do to it.
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mo

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2018, 01:04:12 PM »
Also, I just learned there is such a thing as powdered peanut butter, just add water. I saw it in the grocery store on the shelf with regular peanut butter. That might work for you.
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random axe

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2018, 10:41:22 AM »
Really the main things about peanut butter rather than peanuts are:

1)  It's easier to mix in with other stuff.

2)  Regular peanuts may break my stupid teeth. I usually can eat them, if I remember to be careful.  :nonplused:

vox8

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2018, 05:59:27 PM »
How do you feel about eggs? Eggs are excellent binders.

If you are anti-egg, you can use flax as an egg substitute. Ground up fine and mixed with water flax makes a gelatinous binding agent that works similar to egg whites.

Also worth experimenting with is aquafaba (the liquid in a can of chickpeas). It is pretty magical stuff and can do a lot of the things eggs can do. You can even make meringues out of it. Come to think of it, chickpeas themselves are pretty useful in this kind of application. This looks interesting: http://www.wholelivinglauren.com/new-blog/2016/9/10/peanut-butter-chickpea-protein-bars it makes use of chia seeds, another "soak it and make faux egg white binder stuff" option.

I hate to say it, but vegan sites might have good info for you.

And I second the recommendation for PB powder. It is super fun to mix in.
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random axe

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2018, 07:32:56 PM »
I'll have to shop for PB powder.  I think tangerine's used it before.

I like chickpeas, and my first attempt at veggieburgers was about 45% chickpeas / 45% potato flakes / 10% spinach.  This turned out to be too much spinach; the resulting mix mostly tasted like spinach.  Before I added the spinach, it had a pretty good, pretty neutral salty / savory / starchy flavor.

However, I could not get the mix stiff enough to make patties.  I have a plastic patty press, but it's meant for meat, and even with cooking spray, the mix would not form well, not release well.  And I would definitely have had to cook or freeze the patties before trying to store them.  I tried to store them as a sort of log separated by wax paper, wrapped in wax paper and foil, and . . . that did not work out.  :whatever:

I do think some egg would've helped, but I think maybe cutting the potato content in half and substituting breadcrumbs would've firmed them up a lot.  I was shooting for Dr. Praeger's more than Morningstar or such, but they were really, really wet and soft.

It would have taken a long time for me to consider chickpeas in the power bars, though, and I didn't know about aquafaba.  I considered saving boiled-down pasta water, which is basically liquid farina starch, but it only gels up a little.

random axe

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2018, 07:33:31 PM »
Also, I got nothing against vegans.  I'm not ready to go that far, but I'm most of the way to vegetarianism, nowadays.

vox8

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2018, 07:52:13 PM »
I'I considered saving boiled-down pasta water, which is basically liquid farina starch, but it only gels up a little.

Ah, only if you cook pasta in the modern manner. I once did a series of tests cooking pasta as instructed in Renaissance manuscripts. The cook times specified ranged from 10 to 30 minutes. If you cook pasta for 30 minutes and save the water it will set up as firm as aspic.

Also, all of the professional chefs that say to add a little pasta water to thicken up your sauce are full of baloney. It works in a commercial kitchen because they have one giant pot of simmering water in which they cook all of the batches of pasta over the course of the night. It gets full of starch and does work well as a thickener. But the amount of starch that leeches out of your 8 oz of angelhair that you cooked in a couple of quarts of water for 5 minutes is negligible at best.
"...so I'm pretty sure vox is right." - random axe, 12/11/12

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random axe

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2018, 10:51:15 AM »
Maybe I should be eating more Renaissance pasta.  :hmm:

vox8

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2018, 11:44:05 PM »
Maybe I should be eating more Renaissance pasta.  :hmm:

It was actually quite an interesting experiment. I used fettuccine because it more closely mimics the shape that pasta would have been (flattened as opposed to an extruded tube) and cooked it for 10 minutes, tasted it. Cooked an additional 10 minutes, tasted it. Cooked the final 10 minutes, tasted it. A gentle simmer as opposed to a full rolling boil.

I had expected it to completely disintegrate into a paste, but it didn't. By the time I was done it had puffed up to the size of udon noodles and I had to eat it with a spoon. It was a very delicate texture that just melted in the mouth. One thing it did was make it super easy to eat with a spoon, because it did just fall apart. Which makes me think interesting thoughts about the introduction of the fork and if that changed how people cooked pasta. Because people were eating pasta for centuries before the fork was introduced, so that means they were eating it either with a spoon or a knife (except for in china because chopstitcks, but I was specifically looking at sources from what is now known as Italy). Also there really wasn't much indication that it was eaten with anything that we would consider a "sauce" just butter & cheese.

It was also during this period that I formulated my theory on how pasta was invented. Now truly, this isn't based on anything that I would call evidence but here it goes.

I think that it was someone trying to preserve porridge/gruel. There are all kinds of gruel and porridge recipes that go waaaaaaay back and I think that someone added water to ground grain to make their porridge and then was like "it would be awesome if this was portable" and then figured hey, we can dry it like we dry meat. So they spread it out and let it dry and then cut it into strips and let it dry some more. Then they thought they would reconstitute it with water and it would turn back into porridge/gruel and were like "Whoa, this didn't turn back into porridge/gruel" but decided that it was interesting enough and then tried to see how they could do this better on purpose.

I liken it to the person who invented chocolate chip cookies. That lady wasn't trying to make chocolate chip cookies, she was trying to make chocolate cookies. Her expectation was that she was going to stir these chunks of chocolate into what was her shortbread like cookie dough and that when it cooked the chocolate would melt and meld into the cookie producing an evenly chocolate cookie. She was trying to cut corners and skip the melting the chocolate separately step. Instead the chips stayed intact and poof - chocolate chip cookies. Not what she had intended, but awesome nonetheless.
"...so I'm pretty sure vox is right." - random axe, 12/11/12

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mo

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2018, 11:15:30 AM »
Hey, weird shit happens in the kitchen. Totally possible.

It's symbolic of our struggle against reality.

pdrake

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #25 on: December 24, 2018, 03:00:29 PM »
Couldn't it have been eaten with a crusty bread as opposed to a spoon?
you'd be surprised how much a nutsack can stretch. you have to stretch it yourself, not a woman. they don't do it quite right.

vox8

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #26 on: December 25, 2018, 09:14:27 AM »
Couldn't it have been eaten with a crusty bread as opposed to a spoon?

I guess so, but in the time period I'm referring to bread wasn't particularly used in that manner.
"...so I'm pretty sure vox is right." - random axe, 12/11/12

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random axe

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #27 on: December 26, 2018, 04:52:20 PM »
:thumbsup:

Rice pudding is largely rice cooked until it more or less falls apart, isn't it?  Does anyone make pasta pudding?

pdrake

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #28 on: December 26, 2018, 06:43:49 PM »
yes

you'd be surprised how much a nutsack can stretch. you have to stretch it yourself, not a woman. they don't do it quite right.

random axe

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Re: Fudz
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2018, 01:13:12 PM »
:hmm:


In unrelated news, a theoretically equivalent packet of stevia sweetener isn't nearly as sweet to me as a packet of sucralose.  In coffee, the stevia produces a slight sweet aftertaste I don't get with other sweeteners, but overall I'd say the two kinds I've tried are about the same but maybe 2/3 as sweet as sucralose sweeteners.