Author Topic: Small Screen / Big Screen  (Read 527223 times)

mo

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7305 on: July 01, 2017, 11:31:02 AM »
Maybe your friend should have been a critic, because I'm pretty sure I read a review that sounded similar, but it wasn't a poor memory, it was an interpretation of what they thought Godard was saying.

The variety of cars almost makes it a worthwhile movie on its own.
It's symbolic of our struggle against reality.

mo

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7306 on: July 06, 2017, 05:37:00 PM »
Watched the only film written and directed by Hitchcock, a 1927 silent film, The Ring, which refers both to the boxing ring and a wedding ring, and an upper arm bracelet.

Thereís very little dialog, even for a silent film. Itís a little weird seeing the characters speaking a bunch of dialog, and then expecting to see a dialog intertitle, but there is none in many cases. It shows Hitchcockís lack of interest in dialog, and lack of need for dialog. He uses several tricks in this film to clarify plot points, and itís always clear whatís going on, as opposed to many modern films with dialog that still donít make sense.

I really have a hard time staying focused/awake for silent films, and this one was no different, but itís a pretty amazing film for Hitchcock, in my opinion. He was only 28 years old, his fourth film, and his skill for telling a story visually is just overwhelmingly obvious. The effects, which fail in a lot of his early films, and even some of his later films, are 100% in this one. Itís an important film to see to further appreciate Hitchcock. I didnít think I could be more impressed.
It's symbolic of our struggle against reality.

random axe

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7307 on: July 07, 2017, 02:56:26 PM »
Quote
Itís an important film to see to further appreciate Hitchcock. I didnít think I could be more impressed.

Oh, so you saw him nude, eh?

Dr. Leonard HmofCoy

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7308 on: January 04, 2018, 01:17:09 PM »
Because we were talking about fire damage around Ojai last night (Ojai is a doughnut hole of unburned area surrounded by the Thomas Fire), U3 turned us on to a little indie-ish movie called The One I Love, filmed mostly at Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen's (really pretty) house in Ojai. Warning: DO NOT READ ANYTHING ABOUT THIS MOVIE, it's ludicrously easy to spoil. The setup is, Elisabeth Moss and some guy whose name I forgot play an unhappy married couple. The movie starts with a very uncomfortable couples counseling session, real seat-squirming stuff if you're married. The counselor (Ted Danson) has them each play a random note on a piano, together, and upon hearing this decides they're not 'in sync' and hands them a brochure for a retreat-resort dealie in Ojai, claiming it's done wonders for other couples he's counseled. They agree to go for a weekend, and drive to the ridiculously pretty resort, where they are the only guests and there are no staff. Things seem to be going well. They explore a bit, and find the property also contains a separate guest house. Then, this becomes an ENTIRELY DIFFERENT MOVIE while still revolving around the problems in their marriage. I will say no more. It's on Amazon.
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random axe

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7309 on: January 05, 2018, 10:36:32 AM »
:hmm:

random axe

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7310 on: January 06, 2018, 11:05:29 AM »
I've finally managed to see Season Four of Arrested Development.  Mixed feelings. 

I deeply admire their ability to concoct and execute the complex whatnottery that let them film it despite the cast not all being available at the same times, and the interleaved story is extremely clever.  On the other hand, it's just not nearly as funny as the first three seasons, and all the interleaving makes for an excess of back-and-forth exposition.

I think part of the problem is that the show works on a kind of Fawlty Towers oh-you-effed-this-up tension, and it doesn't have the release valve necessary for comedy if ALL the characters are effing everything up.  There kind of has to be a sane character.  The show's dynamic works best when Michael is screwed up but fairly normal, and then George Michael is the even more normal character who points up when family nonsense is dragging Michael into being crazy.

The show always tended to be weaker when Michael's character was crazier.  He needs to be relatable.  In the fourth season, he and even George Michael are pretty relentlessly as screwed up as everyone else.  It's problematic.

I'd still watch another season, of course.  Don't get me wrong.

random axe

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7311 on: January 09, 2018, 05:43:37 PM »
I tried:

Black Mirror - Something's wrong with this show, and I'm hard-pressed to say what it is.  It's, OK, it's an edgier technology-and-futurism-themed Twilight Zone kind of thing, basically.  The theme seems to get too narrow, but beyond that . . . something's wrong in the tone or the pacing or somewhere.  There are some really nifty bits and ideas, but the episodes feel like they're maybe 50% too long, or something.  The good bits are good enough to make the overall effect a disappointment.

I can't quite figure out what the show needs to fix it, though.


American Horror Story - I only tried the first season, but it annoyed the crap out of me.  Slow, dark, unremarkable exposition mixed with hamtastic cliche.  The cliche isn't mindless; it's . . . I guess I'd say it's camp.  I think that's the problem.  This isn't a campy fun kind of homage to horror, and it isn't scary or intriguing.  It's like campy misery with some gross stuff and jump scares. 

I dunno.  For some horror fans, the form plus the familiar elements should be nostalgic.  Nothing wrong with that.  It really didn't work for me at all, though.  Stylistically, it was like being slapped with a damp 1980s issue of Fangoria.

mo

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Re: Small Screen / Big Screen
« Reply #7312 on: January 10, 2018, 06:47:18 PM »

American Horror Story ...

I wrote here that I liked the first season, but I hardly remember it now. If you didn't like that, it's probably best you stopped. I didn't care for most seasons of it. The last season (7 - "Cult") was different, if nothing else. Partly based on the 'horror' of the last election, with [other] clowns thrown in to boot. If you try any more, that would be the one I would recommend. Edit: Or the 5th season, "Hotel", with Lady Gaga. I liked that one. It's sort of a The Shining ripoff, and that may be why I liked it.

If you get a chance to see the SyFy series, Channel Zero, I'd recommend that much more.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 10:52:18 AM by mo »
It's symbolic of our struggle against reality.